Friday, February 12, 2010

The Other Half of Supplement VI

Okay, so this entry is a bit belated, but I did promise I would post my feedback on the second half of the book.

The second half of Supplement VI describes the campaign world, the demi-humans, and the gods. All of the material would be called "fluff" by our modern gamer parlance, but I find that descriptor a bit insulting, so I shall say that it is all setting/inspiration as opposed to mechanical things like sub-classes and monsters.

The Wilderlands is split into many regions, most of which receive a fairly brief treatment. In fact, many of the regions are more seeds for campaign ideas than anything else, with the various regions being suited to vastly different campaigns; everything from the Stone Age to Asian-themed to Vikings to Greek voyage to courtly intrigue modeled after the Italian City-States. An added bonus is these historical tie-ins provided. It is a compliment to Conley that each of these sections got me thinking that I wanted to run that type of D&D game somewhere down the road.

We get history here, and we get gods We get demi-humans and we get different races of humans who are different in terms of culture rather than game mechanics. That's right... sometimes in this age of endless splatbooks I forget that you don't need a prestige class and half a dozen feats to play a Viking warrior; it really is as simple as playing a fighter.

Again I will mention that I typically do not use published settings, but I do like to read them for inspiration and the purpose of comparing notes, as it were. It has been awhile since I read a setting that started so many fires in my imagination. While it is unlikely anything from the book will make it into my campaign, (at least, as written) it has the gears a'turnin', and with the unfavorable ratio of drek-to-gems clouding the gaming market these days, I consider that among the highest compliments I can give to a product. Well done, sir.

2 comments:

  1. Wasn't sure how people would take the campaign overview. I figured if I put in my thoughts as to why I added the stuff into my campaign that would turn something that very specific into something that of more general use.

    Your comment (and the other I gotten) are very helpful in how I write future stuff for the Majestic Wilderlands.

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  2. That's right... sometimes in this age of endless splatbooks I forget that you don't need a prestige class and half a dozen feats to play a Viking warrior; it really is as simple as playing a fighter.

    Exactly so. Interesting observations. I found the Goodman Games product Punjar: The Tarnished Jewel to be very similar. No mechanics at all, just a brief description of a city.

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